2018/2019 Course Descriptions

Department of Business and Technology
Students in business and computer courses acquire life-long survival skills. These skills give students an opportunity to excel in the business world through exposure to current events and a base of business and computer concepts, which they can expand upon in higher-level courses.

CS#: 101

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Personal Financial Responsibility addresses the identification and management of personal financial resources to meet the financial needs and wants of individuals and families, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, environmental, and maintenance factors. This course helps students build skills in financial responsibility and decision making; analyze personal standards, needs, wants, and goals; identify sources of income, saving and investing; understand banking, budgeting, record-keeping and managing risk, insurance and credit card debt.

CS#: 105

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Marketing is a business course that provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global economy. Emphasis is placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to advertising/promotion/selling, distribution, financing, marketing-information management, pricing, and product/service management. Instructional strategies may include a school-based enterprise, computer/technology applications, real and/or simulated occupational experiences, and projects focused on various marketing functions.

CS#: 110

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Business and Personal Law is a business course that provides an overview of the legal system. Topics covered include: Basics of the Law, Contract Law, Employment Law, Personal Law, and Property Law. Both criminal and civil trial procedures are presented. Instructional strategies should include mock trials, case studies, professional mentoring, job shadowing, field trips, guest speakers, and Internet projects.

CS#: 120F/120S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Course Description:

Cost: $75.00 for 3 college credits through Vincennes University
Note: This course does NOT count towards the AP/dual credit requirement for the Academic Honors Diploma.

Basic College Accounting is a business course that introduces the language of business using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and procedures for proprietorships and partnerships using double-entry accounting. Emphasis is placed on accounting principles as they relate to both manual and automated financial systems. This course involves understanding, analyzing, and recording business transactions and preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial reports as a basis for decision making. Instructional strategies should include the use of computers, projects, simulations, case studies, and business experiences requiring the application of accounting theories and principles.

CS#: 130

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Cost: $75.00 for 3 college credits through Vincennes University
Note: This course does NOT count towards the AP/dual credit requirement for the Academic Honors

Intro to Computer Concepts is a business course that provides instruction in software concepts using a Windows-based professional suite, which includes word processing, spreadsheet, database, graphics, and presentation applications. Instruction in basic computer hardware and operating systems that support software applications is provided. Additional concepts and applications dealing with software integration, Internet use, and information about future technology trends are included. Instructional strategies should include teacher demonstrations, collaborative instruction, interdisciplinary and/or culminating projects, problem-solving and critical-thinking activities, simulations, and minibaskets/in-basket projects.

CS#: 131

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Computer Science Discoveries is a semester entry-level course that will help students to gain a foundation in understanding the different facets of modern computing. This hands-on course includes topics such as the internet, digital information, data & networking, privacy & security, and app development such as games, design, and artificial intelligence / robotics. Students will also begin to learn the concepts and skills of coding.

CS#: 135F/135S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Course Description:

The AP Computer Science Principles course will introduce you to the essential ideas of computer science and show how computing and technology can influence the world around you. Students will creatively address real-world issues and concerns while using the same processes and tools as artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers to bring ideas to life.

Department of English
The English Department supports the mission statement of Bishop Chatard High School and provides courses of study in which students 1) use language, both oral and written, while working with others to learn and solve problems; 2) communicate clearly using oral language and effective listening techniques; 3) read for understanding; 4) select and use appropriate strategies for writing; and 5) use prior knowledge and content area information to reason, apply concepts, and make critical judgments.

CS#: 501

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: C or higher in W131, AP Language/Literature, or an A in Composition 11/Junior Literature

Course Description:

Genres of Literature, a one semester course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is designed to help students learn how to read, think, and write critically and cogently about literature. Students will study four genres—poetry, short story, the novel, and drama—to understand how each genre shapes literary understanding or experiences differently and how different genres enable or constrain the expression of ideas. Students will focus on how to argue about literature, especially when compared with other literary texts or critical commentaries.

CS#: 502

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Themes in Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study of universal themes, such as the journey of the hero, the trials of youth, the search for identity, and other themes appropriate to the level and interests of students. Students will examine sports-based literature of representative works in various genres by authors of diverse eras and nationalities and the way themes may be treated differently in the works because of the cultural context. Students analyze how themes illuminate humanity’s struggle to understand the human condition.

CS#: 503

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Short Stories is a study of the distinct features of the short story, such as being tightly focused narrative fiction. The course may be organized by historical periods, themes, or authors. Students examine short stories with modernist and contemporary themes by a variety of authors from the perspective of audience, purpose, and historical development. Students analyze what distinguishes the short story genre from other literary genres, such as the novel, epic,, romance, biography, and others.

CS#: 506

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: 2.7 cumulative GPA and B or higher in junior English classes

Course Description:

Cost: $25 per credit hour through Indiana University ($75)
Notes: 3 college credits/fulfills high school English requirement.

This course prepares students for writing in a variety of college courses. The focus of this course is on writing from multiple sources to analyze an issue and argue a position. Skills include evaluating sources of information, summarizing sources, adopting a thoughtful position, advancing a clear thesis, and supporting one’s views with evidence.

CS#: 508

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

World Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study of ancient and modern representative works by major authors from six continents: Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. Students examine a wide variety of literary genres and themes. Students analyze how the ideas and concepts presented in the works are both interconnected and reflective of the cultures and historical periods of the countries represented by the authors.

CS#: 510F/510S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Psychometric evaluation & support services committee recommendation.

Course Description:

English 9 Language Support, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Most students enrolled in English 9/Language Support are recommended to take Applied Writing and Math 9 concurrently.

CS#: 511

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Dramatic Literature, a course based on the Indiana Academic Standards for English/Language Arts, is a study of plays and literary art as different from other literary genres. Students view live, televised, or filmed productions and stage scenes from plays or scripts. Students examine tragedies, comedies, melodramas, musicals or operas created by important playwrights and screenwriters representing the literary movements in dramatic literature. Students analyze how live performance alters interpretation from text and how developments in acting and production have altered the way we interpret plays or scripts. Students analyze the relationship between the development of dramatic literature as entertainment and as a reflection of or influence on the culture.

CS#: 515F/515S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

English 9, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

CS#: 520F/520S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

English 9, Honors, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 9 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring a wide-variety of genres and their elements. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 9 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Additionally, the curriculum of this course is designed to address the College Board objectives and to utilize AP Vertical Team strategies for Advanced Placement English courses in an effort to lay important foundation work for future enrollment and success in AP English classes.

CS#: 531F/531S

Grade: 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Psychometric evaluation & support services committee recommendation.

Course Description:

English 10 Language Support, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information. Most students enrolled in English 10/Language Support are recommended to take Applied Writing and Math 10 concurrently.

CS#: 535F/535S

Grade: 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

English 10, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information.

CS#: 540F/540S

Grade: 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: B or higher in English 9 Honors or A in English 9

Course Description:

English 10, an integrated English course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts in Grade 10 is a study of language, literature, composition, and oral communication with a focus on exploring universal themes across a wide variety of genres. Students use literary interpretation, analysis, comparisons, and evaluation to read and respond to representative works of historical or cultural significance appropriate for Grade 10 in classic and contemporary literature balanced with nonfiction. Students write short stories, responses to literature, expository and persuasive compositions, research reports, business letters, and technical documents. Students deliver grade-appropriate oral presentations and access, analyze, and evaluate online information, Additionally, the curriculum of this course is designed to address the College Board objectives and to utilize AP Vertical Team strategies for Advanced Placement English courses in an effort to lay important foundation work for future enrollment and success in AP English classes.

CS#: 550F/550S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Photography and staff application

Course Description:

The Media class will be an advanced photography class where the student photographers cover all events for yearbook, magazine, website, and school functions as well as produce more advanced projects.  This course is part of the publications program and is an application-only class.

CS#: 576

Grade: 11  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Notes: Students must also enroll in a semester literature class.

Composition, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature. Students will also write a research paper during the course of the semester as well as develop a personal statement, resume, and college essay.

CS#: 577

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Notes: Students must also enroll in a semester literature class.

Composition, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature. Students will also write a research paper during the course of the semester.

CS#: 578

Grade: 11  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: Psychometric evaluation & support services committee recommendation

Course Description:

Notes: Students must also enroll in a semester literature class.

Composition/Language Support, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature. Students will also write a research paper during the course of the semester as well as develop a personal statement, resume, and college essay. Some students enrolled in Composition 11/Language Support are recommended to take Language Arts/Math Lab concurrently.

CS#: 579

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: Psychometric evaluation & support services committee recommendation

Course Description:

Notes: Students must also enroll in a semester literature class.

Composition/Language Support, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies of narration, description, exposition, and persuasion. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, English language conventions, research and organizational skills, an awareness of the audience, the purpose for writing, and style. Students read classic and contemporary literature or articles and use appropriate works as models for writing. Students write a variety of types of compositions with a focus on fictional narratives, reflective compositions, academic essays, and responses to literature. Students will also write a research paper during the course of the semester. Some students enrolled in Composition 12/Language Support are recommended to take Language Arts/Math Lab concurrently.

CS#: 581F/581S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: B or higher in Honors English 10 or A in English

Course Description:

Cost: $85

English Literature and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP English course in Literature and Composition engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit. Students are required to take the AP English Literature and Composition exam in May.

CS#: 583F/583S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: B or higher in Honors English 10 or A in English 10. Enrolling in AP US History simultaneously is highly recommended.

Course Description:

Cost: $85

English Language and Composition, Advanced Placement, is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. Students are required to take the AP English Language and Composition exam in May.

CS#: 584

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Prerequisites: 2.7 cumulative GPA

Course Description:

Cost: $25 per credit hour through Indiana University ($75)
Notes: 3 college credits.

Speech, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is the study and application of the basic principles and techniques of effective oral communication. Students deliver focused and coherent speeches that convey clear messages, using gestures, tone, and vocabulary appropriate to the audience and purpose. Students deliver different types of oral and multi-media presentations, including viewpoint, instructional, demonstration, informative, persuasive, and impromptu. Students use the same Standard English conventions for oral speech that they use in their writing.

CS#: 586

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Debate, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is the study and application of the basic principles of debate involving support for the basic types of arguments (induction, deduction, causation) and debate strategies (affirmative or negative argument construction and extension, case development, refutation or rebuttal of argument claims and evidence, and persuasive speaking). Debate Project: Students complete a project, such as a mock debate or trial, participation in a forum, competition, or tournament, or an argument supporting or opposing different sides of a major issue, which demonstrates knowledge, application, and presentation progress in the Debate course content.

CS#: 588

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Contemporary Literature, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study of how post-1950s literature from around the world, such as North and South America, Europe and Great Britain, the Middle East, and post-colonial Africa and Asia, addresses contemporary issues. Students examine multiple genres to develop a sense of how particular genres are used today to represent ideas and events. Students analyze different theories and methods of textual criticism, especially theories popular currently. Students analyze how the interpretations and themes of contemporary literature read in this

CS#: 590

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Creative Writing, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a study and application of the rhetorical (effective) writing strategies for prose and poetry. Using the writing process, students demonstrate a command of vocabulary, the nuances of language and vocabulary, English language conventions, an awareness of the audience, the purposes for writing, and the style of their own writing.

CS#: 594

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Etymology, a language studies course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for English/Language Arts is a course that helps students build vocabulary through a knowledge of Greek and Latin prefixes, roots, and suffixes. The course also provides connotative and denotative meanings of words in written and oral contexts. Emphasis is on the practical use of derivatives, including increased writing skills and better understanding of written material. Recommended for college, this course does require rigorous memorization, daily homework, and weekly quizzes.

CS#: 595

Grades: 9 - 11  /  Semester  /  Elective

Prerequisites: B average in English required. Strong writing skills recommended.

Course Description:

Beginning Journalism emphasizes journalistic writing and design skills. Students will write news, features, sports, editorials, press releases, broadcasts, columns and yearbook features. Journalism law, ethics, and news judgment are also addressed. Yearbook/newspaper design, graphics, staff management, time management and computer skills are also included in the class. It is highly recommended students take this course before applying for any of the journalism staffs. Students may be recommended for a staff position on Newspaper or Yearbook.

CS#: 596F/596S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Beginning Journalism is highly recommended, but students with strong English skills may have the Beginning Journalism requirement waived with permission of the publications adviser. A staff application is required.

Course Description:

This course is devoted to an advanced and continued study of journalistic writing and publications technique through the practical application of skills learned in beginning journalism. The members of this class are the staff members of the school newsmagazine, Trojan Matters. The newsmagazine will range in size from 8 – 16 pages and cover all aspects of school life including news, features, opinion, sports, and photography sections. Journalistic skills include writing, editing, interviewing, desktop publishing, digital and film photography, and digital imaging. Credit can be received for this class during the sophomore, junior, and senior years.

CS#: 599F/599S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Beginning Journalism is highly recommended, but students with strong English skills may have the Beginning Journalism requirement waived with permission of the publications adviser. A staff application is required.

Course Description:

The members of this class are the staff members of The Citadel, the school yearbook. The staff produces the 240+ page yearbook for the school and community. The yearbook will cover all aspects of school life including student life, activities, clubs, sports, academics, advertising, and photography. Journalistic skills of writing, editing, interviewing, desktop publishing, digital and film photography, and computer graphics are all hands-on in the application course. Students will work on both individual and staff assignments. Credit can be received for class during the sophomore, junior, and senior years.

CS#: 850F/850S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Support services committee recommendation

Course Description:

Language Arts/Math Lab will focus on elements of the writing process across different genres. Students in LA/Math Lab are also enrolled in grade level English and math courses. The focus for this class will be to provide students with organizational, analytical, and practical language and math- based strategies throughout the curriculum.

CS#: 851F/851S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Support services committee recommendation

Course Description:

Language Arts/Math Lab will focus on elements of the writing process across different genres. Students in LA/Math Lab are also enrolled in grade level English and math courses. The focus for this class will be to provide students with organizational, analytical, and practical language and math- based strategies throughout the curriculum.

CS#: 852

Grade: 9  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Essential Skills is a multidisciplinary course that provides students continuing opportunities to develop basic skills including: (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) listening, (4) speaking, (5) mathematical computation, (6) note taking, (7) study and organizational skills, and (8) problem-solving skills, which are essential for high school course work achievement. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this course is based on Indiana’s standards, individual school corporation general curriculum plans, and the student’s individual needs.

Department of Health and Wellness Education
The goal of the Health and Physical Education curriculum is to help students acquire and implement the necessary knowledge and skills for life-long health and fitness. Current health and physical education courses offer students a varied selection of courses designed to help them attain these skills.  

CS#: 800F/800S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

Physical Education I is designed to help students become more aware of the purpose and value of physical fitness for an active and healthy future. Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of a variety of team and individual sports, which will enable them to enjoy the role of participant or spectator. Physical Education class will include units in flag football, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball, tennis, bowling, ice-skating, conditioning, weight training, and floor hockey. Adaptive physical education is offered as needed in the least restricted environment and on individual assessment.

CS#: 801F/801S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

Physical Education I is designed to help students become more aware of the purpose and value of physical fitness for an active and healthy future. Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of a variety of team and individual sports, which will enable them to enjoy the role of participant or spectator. Physical Education class will include units in flag football, soccer, speedball, basketball, volleyball, softball, tennis, bowling, ice-skating, conditioning, weight training, and floor hockey. Adaptive physical education is offered as needed in the least restricted environment and on individual assessment.

CS#: 805

Grades: 9 - 10  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Health & Wellness, a course based on Indiana’s Academic Standards for Health & Wellness, provides the basis to help students adopt and maintain healthy behaviors. Health education should contribute directly to a student’s ability to successfully practice behaviors that protect and promote health and avoid or reduce health risks. Through a variety of instructional strategies, students practice the development of functional health information (essential concepts); determine personal values that support healthy behaviors; develop group norms that value a healthy lifestyle; develop the essential skills necessary to adopt, practice, and maintain health-enhancing behaviors. This course includes the application of priority areas in a planned, sequential, comprehensive health education curriculum. Priority areas include: promoting personal health and wellness, physical activity, healthy eating, promoting safety and preventing unintentional injury and violence, promoting mental and emotional health, a tobacco-free lifestyle and an alcohol- and other drug-free lifestyle and promoting human development and family health. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills of health and wellness core concepts, analyzing influences, accessing information, interpersonal communication, decision-making and goal-setting skills, health-enhancing behaviors, and health and wellness advocacy skills.

CS#: 807

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Physical Education II: Lifetime Fitness is an advanced physical education course emphasizes the development and maintenance of physical fitness of the total body through aerobic instruction, individual and team activities/sports, cardiorespiratory endurance, and muscular strength.  This course is designed for students of all athletic levels and abilities who desire a physically fit lifestyle.

CS#: 808

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Physical Education II: Athletic Weight Training is an advanced physical education course featuring instruction in the techniques of weight training and conditioning as they pertain to athletic competition. 

This course involves a physically demanding program of weight training and fitness activities designed to enhance strength, speed, agility, flexibility, jumping, and coordination.  This course is designed for students participating in competitive sports and is not designed for those with casual interest.

(Note: A version of this Elective Physical Education class is being introduced during the 2018-2019 school year. The class meets prior to school four days per week and participants earn 1/2 credit hour. Contact the BCHS Athletic Office for more information.)

Department of Mathematics
The Math Department has established many courses and various levels of these courses to meet the individual needs and ability levels of all students.  Realizing that math skills permeate all facets of life,  it is essential that each student develop his or her potential and feel confident and successful when applying math concepts.    

CS#: 715F/715S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

Note: Required unless Algebra I was taken in middle school and student has passed the BCHS Algebra I proficiency exam.

Algebra I formalizes and extends the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. Five critical areas comprise Algebra I: Relations and Functions; Linear Equations and Inequalities; Quadratic and Nonlinear Equations; Systems of Equations and Inequalities; and Polynomial Expressions. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

CS#: 720F/720S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

Note:Required unless Algebra I was taken in middle school and student has passed the BCHS Algebra I proficiency exam.

Algebra I Honors is an accelerated, more in-depth treatment of material taught in Academic Algebra I with a higher degree of difficulty in problem solving requirements. Students will display mastery of the following topics: data analysis, graphing, inequalities, radicals, linear functions, quadratic functions, exponential functions, polynomial functions and rational functions.

CS#: 735F/735S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Algebra I or student has passed the BCHS Algebra I proficiency exam. Placement test score, proficiency exam score, and grade school recommendation will determine level.

Course Description:

Geometry formalizes and extends students’ geometric experiences from the middle grades. Students explore more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships, moving towards formal mathematical arguments. Six critical areas comprise the Geometry course: Congruency and Similarity; Measurement; Analytic Geometry; Circles; and Polyhedra. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

CS#: 740F/740S

Grades: 9 - 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: B or higher in Honors Algebra I or A in Algebra I or student has passed the BCHS Algebra I proficiency exam. Placement test score, proficiency exam score, and grade school recommendation will determine level.

Course Description:

Geometry Honors is an accelerated course in Euclidean geometry. This course covers all the material in Academic Geometry plus coordinate geometry and some solid geometry.

CS#: 755F/755S

2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Geometry or teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Algebra II emphasizes the structure of the number system. It includes a review of Algebra I, increases skill and speed in handling processes, and provides familiarity with advanced principles and methods. Exponents and logarithms are covered in this course. The expanded topics of the course include: the theorems and algorithms of algebra, polynomials and polynomial functions, rational exponents, complex numbers, sequence and series, matrices, and exponential and logarithmic functions. A graphing calculator is required.

CS#: 760F/760S

Grades: 10 - 11  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: B or higher in Honors Algebra I or A in Algebra I.

Course Description:

Algebra II Honors emphasizes the structure of the number system. It includes a review of Algebra I, increases skill and speed in handling processes, and provides familiarity with advanced principles and methods. Exponents and logarithms are covered in this course. The expanded topics of the course include: the theorems and algorithms of algebra, polynomials and polynomial functions, rational exponents, complex numbers, sequence and series, matrices, and exponential and logarithmic functions. This course is an accelerated, more in-depth treatment of the material taught in Algebra II. A graphing calculator is required.

CS#: 765F/765S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Honors Algebra II and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Statistics Advanced Placement introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inferences. Projects and work outside of the classroom will be required, and students are required to take the AP exam in May. This course is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. A graphing calculator is required.

CS#: 775F/775S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Algebra II

Course Description:

Probability & Statistics is designed for students wishing to take an applied math course. Topics studied include Venn diagrams, combinatorics, data gathering, statistical measurements, simple to complex probability, sampling, and statistical distributions. Whenever possible, students will plan and conduct experiments or surveys and analyze the resulting data. A graphing calculator is required.

CS#: 784F/784S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: C or higher in Algebra II.

Course Description:

Pre-Calculus builds on algebraic functions and extends them to new concepts. Conic sections, trigonometry, and polar coordinates will be explored in this course. Emphasis will be on the basic equations, graphs, and theory behind these topics. Trigonometric identities and applications will also be covered. This course will meet the trigonometric requirements for many universities.

CS#: 785F/785S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: A or B in Honors Algebra II or A in Algebra II

Course Description:

Pre-Calculus Honors is a synthesis and expansion of algebraic and
geometric ideas previously learned. Students will study college
algebra topics which include more complex functions, sequences and series, vectors and conic sections. One semester of this course is devoted to trigonometry with emphasis on triangular relationships, identities,
and equations. Students will also advance their understanding of imaginary numbers through an investigation of complex numbers and polar coordinates. This is a more rigorous course requiring more complex thought processes and rationalizing answers.

CS#: 793

Grade: 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Calculus (AB): AP

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Calculus (BC) Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established and copyrighted by the College Board. The course is not intended to be used as a dual credit course. AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AP Calculus AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series.

This course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.

The content of AP Calculus BC is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for AP Calculus AB.

CS#: 794F/794S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: C or higher in Honors Pre-Calculus; B or higher in Pre-Calculus; B or higher in Honors Algebra II or Algebra II.

Course Description:

Calculus Honors is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the concepts of calculus. The course emphasizes a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Topics include: (1) functions, graphs, and limits; (2) derivatives; and (3) integrals.

CS#: 795F/795S

Grade: 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: B or higher in Honors Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Calculus Advanced Placement presents a rigorous study of all functions and their limits, derivatives, integrals, and the corresponding applications of each. Students can expect at least one hour per night of individual study. This course is an advanced placement course based on content established by the College Board. Students are required to take the AP exam in May. A graphing calculator is required.

CS#: 797F/797S

Grade: 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: 2.7 cumulative GPA; Algebra II required; Pre-Calculus recommended

Course Description:

Cost: $25 per credit hour through Indiana University ($75)

Finite Math works on sets, counting, and basic probability, including random variables and expected values. Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, and applications are also a part of the curriculum of the course.

Department of Science
The Science Department offers a variety of classes at various levels to meet the individual needs and abilities of all students.  Knowledge of science permeate all facets of life, and it is essential that students realize their potential and feel confident about their understanding of scientific principles.

CS#: 605F/605S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

Biology I Honors introduces the student to the distinguishing properties of living organisms. Students will explore more deeply the unique nature of life, classification, cell structure and function, genetics, microbiology, multi-cellular plants, animals, ecology, and evolution. Laboratory experiments will emphasize problem-solving techniques with hands-on experiences such as dissection and proper microscope usage. Additionally, the curriculum of this course is designed to address the College Board objectives and to utilize AP Vertical Team strategies for Advanced Placement Science courses in an effort to lay important foundation work for future enrollment and success in AP Science classes.

CS#: 610F/610S

Grades: 9 - 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Placement test score or grade school recommendation

Course Description:

Biology I introduces the student to the distinguishing properties of living organisms. Students will explore more deeply the unique nature of life, classification, cell structure and function, genetics, microbiology, multi-cellular plants, animals, ecology, and evolution. Laboratory experiments will emphasize problem-solving techniques with hands-on experiences such as dissection and proper microscope usage.

CS#: 615F/615S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Course Description:

Anatomy and Physiology Honors will introduce students to the anatomy, physiology and development of the human body. The course begins with an introduction to the human organism, approaching the human body in terms of overall layout: body plan, organization, and the systems that maintain life and regulation, or homeostasis. Next, various organ systems and their related processes will be discussed. Finally, students will explore disease, how it disrupts the natural flow of the body systems, and the best routes to health. Approximately 25 percent of class time will be spent in lab.

CS#: 635F/635S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Biology Advanced Placement is a comprehensive investigation of biology at the college freshman level. All levels of organization, from molecular to ecosystem, are included. Sections include molecular and cell biology, genetics, evolution, taxonomy, survey of plants, survey of animals, and ecology. An emphasis is placed on current advances in biotechnology. An investigative approach is taken with the 12 standard laboratories recommended by the College Board. Biology Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students will be required to take the College Board AP Biology exam.

CS#: 640F/640S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Course Description:

Earth and Space Science is a Core 40 physical science course. It provides students with a basic understanding of the four areas of Earth and Space Science: meteorology, geology, astronomy, and oceanography. Students will examine Earth’s interconnected systems that may be changing or may be in equilibrium. Topics of study will include plate tectonics, weather maps, rock & mineral systems, earthquakes, stars, and planets.

CS#: 645F/645S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Course Description:

Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary course that integrates biology, Earth science, chemistry, and other disciplines. Students enrolled in this course conduct in-depth scientific studies of ecosystems, population dynamics, resource management, and environmental consequences of natural and anthropogenic processes. Students formulate, design, and carry out laboratory and field investigations as an essential course component. Students completing Environmental Science acquire the essential tools for understanding the complexities of national and global

CS#: 646F/646S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Environmental Science, Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students enrolled in AP Environmental Science investigate the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

CS#: 650F/650S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Algebra I

Course Description:

Integrated Chemistry-Physics is for students who are interested in Chemistry and Physics but choose not to take Chemistry take this lab-based course to fulfill Core 40 requirements. Students will be exposed to practical applications of Chemistry and Physics. With an emphasis on common scientific processes, studies will include: velocity, momentum, acceleration, thermal energy, periodic table, chemical bonds, laws of motion, electricity and different forms of energy. A working knowledge of algebra is required.

CS#: 660F/660S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Biology

Course Description:

Chemistry I will fulfill Academic Honors Diploma requirements. This course will be less rigorous than Chemistry: Honors. This course will provide a background for success in college chemistry, though will not strive for as much depth of study as Chemistry: Honors by meeting the following objectives: 1) students will develop a lesser sense of memorization, to be replaced by independent formation of concepts, scientific reasoning, and common sense; 2) students will develop competency in solving word problems by the factor-label method; 3) values achieved from the course will be of a practical nature, of an aesthetic nature, and of a preparatory nature for the study of any discipline. Subject matter will include the metric system, atomic theory, chemical nomenclature, writing formulas, balancing chemical equations, periodic trends of the elements, chemical bonding, and gas laws. Students should expect to move through the textbook rapidly, making this more of a chemistry survey course.

CS#: 661F/661S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: 80% or higher in Honors Biology; teacher recommendation if in Biology; currently enrolled in Honors Algebra II or a higher-level math class

Course Description:

Chemistry I Honors provides students a background for success in college Chemistry by meeting the following objectives: 1) students will develop a lesser sense of memorization, to be replaced by independent formation of concepts, scientific reasoning, and common sense; 2) students will develop competency in solving word problems by the factor-label method; 3) values achieved from the course will be of a practical nature, of an aesthetic nature, and of a preparatory nature for the study of any discipline. Subject matter will include the metric system, atomic theory, chemical nomenclature, writing formulas, balancing chemical equations, periodic trends of the elements, chemical bonding, and gas laws. Students successfully completing this course will be able to think critically about their physical world and be prepared to study Chemistry at the next level.

CS#: 662F/662S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Biology; Honors Chemistry; Pre-Calculus, may be taken concurrently; and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Chemistry Advanced Placement is offered for those students who are willing to accept the challenge of a rigorous, in-depth academic course. It will use a college text, and will mimic the experience of a quality first-semester college chemistry course. Topics will include nomenclature, stoichiometry, acid-base and redox reactions, gas laws, thermodynamics, bonding (VSEPR) and molecular geometry, rates and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and organic chemistry. Students should expect one hour of homework each night. Chemistry Advanced Placement is based on content established by the College Board. Students will be required to take the College Board AP Chemistry exam.

CS#: 671F/671S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Algebra II, may be taken concurrently

Course Description:

Physics I is a course focused on the following core topics: motion and forces; energy and momentum; temperature and thermal energy transfer; electricity and magnetism; vibrations and waves; light and optics. Instruction should focus on developing student understanding that scientific knowledge is gained from observation of natural phenomena and experimentation by designing and conducting investigations guided by theory and by evaluating and communicating the results of those investigations according to accepted procedures.

CS#: 672F/672S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry; Honors Pre-Calculus, may be taken concurrently; and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Physics I, Advanced Placement is organized around seven foundational big ideas in physics and is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power,; an introduction to electric circuits; and mechanical waves and sound. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

CS#: 673

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Principles of Engineering is a course that focuses on the process of applying engineering, technological, scientific and mathematical principles in the design, production, and operation of products, structures, and systems. This is a hands-on course designed to provide students interested in engineering careers to explore experiences related to specialized fields such as civil, mechanical, and materials engineering. Students will engage in research, development, planning, design, production, and project management to simulate a career in engineering. The topics of ethics and the impacts of engineering decisions are also addressed. Classroom activities are organized to allow students to work in teams and use modern technological processes, computers, and production systems in developing and presenting solutions to engineering problems

Department of Social Studies
The goal of the social studies curriculum is to educate students about the physical, political, economic, social, cultural, and historical world.  Social studies teaches students to be life-long learners, leaders and active citizens living Catholic values. Students develop written and verbal communication skills and critical thinking abilities. The social studies curriculum strives to educate all students to have an understanding of the world and its people.

CS#: 301F/301S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

Geography and History of the World is designed to enable students to use the geographic “way of looking at the world” to deepen their understanding of major global themes that have manifested themselves over time—for example, the origin and spread of world religions, exploration, conquest and imperialism, urbanization and innovations and revolutions.

CS#: 310F/310S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

World History and Civilization is a general survey course of the world’s historical development from the beginnings of civilization to the present. Major components of the course include religion, exploration, feudalism, monarchy, democracy, dictatorship, revolution, nationalism, industrialism, and imperialism.

CS#: 315F/315S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills highly recommended

Course Description:

Cost: $85
World History, Advanced Placement is a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. The course will have a chronological frame from the periods 8000 B.C. E. to the present. AP World History focuses on five overarching themes (1) interaction between humans and the environment, (2) development and interaction of cultures, (3) state-building, expansion, and conflict, (4) creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems, and (5) development and transformation of social structures. Students are required to take the AP U.S. History exam in May.

CS#: 320F/320S

Grade: 11  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

United States History builds upon concepts developed in previous social studies classes. Students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. They will develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time.

CS#: 325F/325S

Grade: 11  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation

Course Description:

United States History Honors builds upon concepts developed in previous social studies classes. Students are expected to identify and review significant events, persons, and movements in the early development of the nation. The course then gives major emphasis to the interaction of key events, people, and political, economic, social, and cultural influences in national developments from the late nineteenth century through the present. Students are expected to trace and analyze chronological periods and examine the significant themes and concepts in U.S. History. They will develop historical thinking and research skills and use primary and secondary sources to explore topical issues and to understand the cause for changes in the nation over time. Students enrolled in this honor level U.S. History course pursue a more in-depth study of the material taught in the U.S. History class. Additional outside reading, discussions, research and writing are required.

CS#: 328F/328S

Grade: 11  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills highly recommended and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
United States History Advanced Placement is a rigorous college-level course taught to AP standards. It will require significant home study and reading as well as serious in-class participation. Summer reading will be required before the first day. The course will include topics such as discovery and settlement, British Empire, colonial society, American Revolution, the Constitution, Jefferson, nationalism, sectionalism, Jackson, territorial expansion, Civil War, reconstruction, industrialization, urban society, Gilded Age, foreign policy, Progressive Era, WWI, Roaring Twenties, Depression, New Deal, WWII, Cold War/Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, civil rights, Vietnam, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Middle East and today. U.S. History Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students are required to take the College Board AP U.S. History exam in May.

CS#: 330

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

United States Government provides a framework for understanding the purposes, principles, and practices of constitutional representative democracy in the United States. Responsible and effective participation of citizens is stressed. Students will understand the nature of citizenship, politics, and governments and understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens and how these are part of local, state, and national government. Students will examine how the United States Constitution protects rights and provides the structure and functions of various levels of government. How the United States interacts with other nations and the government’s role in world affairs will be examined. Using primary and secondary resources, students will articulate, evaluate, and defend positions on political issues. As a result, students will be able to explain the role of individuals and groups in government, political and civic activities, and the need for civic and political engagement of citizens in the United States.

CS#: 331

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Economics will provide students with a basic understanding of the American economic system and the role the individual plays in that system. Topics include supply and demand, monetary and fiscal policy, taxes, business, labor, business cycle, inflation, consumer economics, communism, and international economics. This course also includes instruction concerning personal financial literacy and responsibility in accordance with state requirements.

CS#: 337

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills recommended and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Macroeconomics Advanced Placement is a rigorous college-level course taught to the College Board AP standards. It will require significant home study and extensive in-class participation. This course will study the U.S. economy as a whole in a global context. Topics covered will include aggregate supply and demand, national income accounting, unemployment, inflation, business cycle, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, economic growth, international trade and finance. This course also includes instruction concerning personal financial literacy and responsibility in accordance with state requirements. Students will be required to take the AP Macroeconomics exam in May. This class fulfills the economics requirement for graduation.

CS#: 338

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Government: Advanced Placement is a rigorous college-level course taught to AP standards. It will require significant home study and extensive in-class participation. The course will analyze American politics by studying public opinion, political behavior, the Constitution, political parties, interest groups, political institutions, and civil rights and liberties. U.S. Government Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students will be required to take the College Board AP U.S. Government exam in May.

CS#: 360

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Sociology, the study of human societies and social behavior, provides students opportunities to study the greater world and context in which they live. Students will look at this greater context by studying significant sociological contributions, social structure, social stratification, social groups, and social change among other topics. Students will also explore how this greater world and context impacts them as individuals now and in the future. Students will have the opportunity to develop a sociological imagination, which enables them to view their own lives within a larger social and historical context.

CS#: 361

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Indiana Studies is an integrated course that compares and contrasts state and national developments in the areas of politics, economics, history, and culture. The course uses Indiana history as a basis for understanding current policies, practices, and state legislative procedures. It also includes the study of state and national constitutions from a historical perspective and as a current foundation of government. Examination of individual leaders and their roles in a democratic society will be included and student will examine the participation of citizens in the political process. Selections from Indiana arts and literature may also be analyzed for insights into historical events and cultural expressions.

CS#: 362

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Ethnic Studies provides opportunities to broaden students’ perspectives concerning lifestyles and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States. This course will either focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or use a comparative approach to the study of patterns of cultural development, immigration, and assimilation, as well as the contributions of specific ethnic or cultural groups. The course may also include analysis of the political impact of ethnic diversity in the United States.

CS#: 370

Grades: 11 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Note: Students may not receive credit in both Psychology and Psychology: AP

Psychology is a general introduction into the study of human behavior. General topics discussed include social interaction, life span development, social cognition and methods of therapy. Specific components studied include perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, stress, consciousness and prejudice. Students will also be introduced to the steps involved in conducting psychological research.

CS#: 371F/371S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills highly recommended

Course Description:

Cost: $85
Note: Students may not receive credit in both Psychology and Psychology: AP

Psychology Advanced Placement is a course that provides students with the content established by the College Board. Topics include 1) history and approaches, 2) research methods, 3) biological bases of behavior, 4) sensation and perception, 5) states of consciousness, 6) learning, 7) cognition, 8) motivation and emotion, 9) developmental psychology, 10) personality, 11) testing and individual differences, 12) abnormal psychology, 13) treatment of psychological disorders, and 14) social psychology. Students are required to take the College Board AP Psychology exam in May.

CS#: 375F/375S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Elective

Prerequisites: Strong reading comprehension skills highly recommended

Course Description:

Cost: $85
European History Advanced Placement develops an understanding of the main themes in modern European history, including political and diplomatic, intellectual and cultural, and social and economic history. Analyzing historical evidence and reading critical literary narratives are integrated into the chronologically ordered whole picture of the modern history of Europe. Using a college-level textbook, this course begins with the Renaissance and concludes with the demise of communism in Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, and the crisis of global terrorism. European History Advanced Placement is a course based on content established by the College Board. Students will be required to take the College Board AP European History exam in May.

Department of Theology
The theology curriculum of Bishop Chatard is designed to encompass all major points and to advance further topics suggested by the United States Council of Catholic Bishops (USCCB).

CS#: 010F/010S

Grade: 9  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

The first semester will give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Students will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. Students will pay particular attention to the Gospels where they may grow to love and know Jesus more personally. Second semester explores the Mystery of Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, the second person of the Blessed Trinity. Students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate revelation from God. The students will also learn who Jesus calls them to be.

CS#: 020F/020S

Grade: 10  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

The first semester is designed to help students understand all that God has done and accomplished through Jesus Christ, most notably the redemption of humanity. They will be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Jesus Christ. In the second semester they will learn how the Church, founded by the apostles through Jesus Christ, is sustained by both human and divine elements. They will learn about the sacredness of the Church in all her dimensions: as mystery, sacrament, servant, herald, community and institution.

CS#: 030F/030S

Grade: 11  /  2 Semesters  /  Required

Course Description:

First semester students will learn how they can encounter Christ in full and real ways in and through the sacraments, especially the Eucharist. Students will examine all 7 sacraments in detail to learn how to encounter Christ throughout their lives. Second semester will help students see that it is only through Christ that they can fulfill God’s plan for their lives. Students will learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the life of a disciple.

CS#: 043

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Note: Seniors must choose two different semester theology courses.

The purpose of this course is to give an overview of Sacred Scripture with an introduction to the basic principles for understanding and interpreting the Bible. The course will examine Scripture as the narrative of Salvation History, exploring the presence of God’s action in this record of His Revelation, and recognizing God’s desire to share his merciful love with us.

CS#: 044

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Note: Seniors must choose two different semester theology courses.

The purpose of this course is to supply the students with a general knowledge of the Church’s history from apostolic times to the present. This course introduces the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him throughout history through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today and, as such, has both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn about the Church’s 2,000 years of history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles.

CS#: 045

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Note: Seniors must choose two different semester theology courses.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Church’s social teaching. In this course, students will learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission. Issues such as capital punishment, immigration, discrimination and stewardship of the earth will be explored through writings of popes, bishops and lay people who are recognized as leaders in the area of social justice.

CS#: 047

Grade: 12  /  Semester  /  Required

Course Description:

Note: Seniors must choose two different semester theology courses.

The purpose of this course is to help the students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to and differs from non-Catholic Christians as well as other religions of the world. The course is intended to help students to recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in non-Catholic Christian churches and ecclesial communities as well as in non-Christian religions.

Department of Unified Arts
The curriculum in the Unified Arts Department supports the mission of the school by providing a foundation for students who are particularly interested in practical arts and performing arts. Students enrolled in these classes develop self-esteem through creative expression while simultaneously acquiring life-long skills that will help them in many related careers. Practical Arts courses emphasize drafting and family and consumer science classes. Performing Arts courses allow students to meet Fine Arts graduation requirements while developing their skills in the areas of art, choir, band or drama.

CS#: 200

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art is an introduction to art through a working understanding of the Elements and Principles of Design and provides students with the fundamentals of art appreciation, art evaluation, and art production skills. Studio work includes drawing, painting, perspective, pencil rendering, color and design principles. Although no previous art instruction is necessary, students must be highly motivated. Students are graded primarily on the quality of work they hand in as well as personal improvement. This class is one of the introductory courses required before selecting advanced art classes.

CS#: 202

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Introduction to Two-Dimensional Art

Course Description:

Drawing concentrates on developing the student’s drawing and observational skills. Students will engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass an advanced understanding of the Elements and Principles of Design, art history, art criticism, aesthetics and production. Students will learn shading, perspective, figure drawing and observational work. The emphasis will be on realistic rendering and craftsmanship while enhancing visual perception. Students will use and develop a personal sketchbook. This course is designed for students who are interested in the field of art and requires drawing and work outside of class.

CS#: 210

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Introduction to Three-Dimensional Art offers the student a chance to create three-dimensional artwork, while exploring a variety of media, including paper-mâché, plastic, paper, wire and found objects. Techniques include carving, molding and assembly. Emphasis will be placed on design principles, the studio aspect, as well as working with art history, aesthetic and critical issues. Students will learn both realistic and abstract processes. This course is designed for students who are interested in the field of art and requires drawing and work outside of class.

CS#: 214F/214S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Cost: $85

Art History Advanced Placement is designed to allow students to examine major forms of artistic expression relevant to a variety of cultures evident in wide variety of periods from present times into the past. Students acquire an ability to examine works of art critically, with intelligence and sensitivity, and to articulate their thoughts and experiences. In this course, students examine major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures (historical context) to gain an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts. They learn to look at works of art critically (artistic perception), with intelligence and sensitivity (aesthetic valuing), and analyze (art criticism) what they see. All students successfully completing the AP Art History course should gain an in-depth knowledge of the subject, as well as form disciplined study habits that can contribute to continued success at the college level. This course requires a high degree of commitment to academic work (including writing skills) and to the purposes of a program designed to meet the College Board standards. All students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Exam as part of the course requirement.

CS#: 220

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Ceramics is designed for students who are interested in learning how to create ceramic artwork through an understanding of the Elements and Principles of Design. Students will create works of art in clay utilizing the process of hand building, molds, wheel throwing, slip and glaze techniques, and the firing processes. Students will engage in sequential learning experiences that encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, and production. Students search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work through an in-depth analysis of historical and contemporary ceramics from a variety of cultural groups. Students will critically examine the relationships between context, form, function and meaning in their own work and in historical and contemporary ceramic works. This class is one of the introductory classes required before selecting advanced art classes.

CS#: 225

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Introduction to Two Dimensional Art

Course Description:

Digital Design introduces computers to students as an art tool. Students will create artwork with graphic art software, digital cameras and scanners. Along with design and color theory, students will use a variety of design approaches anchored in both art history and in contemporary production. Artwork will be a result of computer generated images in conjunction with 2-D drawing skills and an understanding of design principles. Students will participate in aesthetic discussions and critiques. Additionally students will reflect upon the outcome of these experiences, write about the process, and make presentations about the progress or projects. They will also be challenged to solve compositional layouts and sequencing events in order to achieve desired effects. Projects will range from simple one-day tutorials to multiple-week projects. Students will learn about current artists and careers in the field of computer art.

CS#: 230

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Introduction Two-Dimensional Art

Course Description:

Students in Painting will develop their knowledge of the fundamentals of watercolors and acrylics. Major areas of emphasis include selecting a subject, planning a painting, using color, uniting a picture and completing a painting. Students who master these areas of painting will develop the skills that will allow them to progress from an uncertain amateur to a mature painter. The components of this course encompass art history, art criticism, aesthetics, production and an advanced understanding of the Elements and Principles of Design. Students will search for meaning, significance, and direction in their work. This course is designed for students who are interested in self-expression.

CS#: 236F/236S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85

Studio Art Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. Portfolios are designed by students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art is not based on a written examination; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year. The AP program is a cooperative endeavor that helps high school students complete college-level courses and permits colleges to evaluate, acknowledge, and encourage that accomplishment through the granting of appropriate credit and placement.

Drawing Portfolio: The Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Any work that makes use of photographs, published images, and/or other artists’ works must show substantial and significant development beyond duplication.

2-D Design Portfolio: This portfolio is intended to address a very broad interpretation of two-dimensional (2-D) design issues. This type of design involves purposeful decision-making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an integrative way. For this portfolio, students are asked to demonstrate proficiency in 2-D design using a variety of art forms. Any work that makes use of photographs, published images, and/or other artists’ works must show substantial and significant development beyond duplication.

3-D Design Portfolio: This portfolio is intended to address a broad interpretation of sculptural issues in depth and space. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction, and expression may be part of the student’s portfolio. Any work that is derived from photographs, published images, and/or other artists’ works must show substantial and significant development beyond duplication.

CS#: 240

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Theatre Arts provides an opportunity for students to study all elements of theatre. The class is primarily project and performance based. Students will learn basic skills in acting and performance. Students will also have the opportunity to study what takes place on the backstage side of the production. Students are encouraged to take this class if they are interested in participating in the shows that Bishop Chatard presents each year. Major topics covered in the class are: Improvisation, Pantomime, Voice and Diction, Technical Theatre, Theatre History, and more. Students who are enrolled in Theatre Arts are required to participate in both shows to some capacity. If the student chooses not to be on the cast or crew, he/she must attend at least one set day.

CS#: 241

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Theatre Arts

Course Description:

Advanced Theatre: Theatre History Through Scene Study is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in this course read and analyze plays and apply criteria to make informed judgments. They draw on events and experiences to create scripted monologues and scenes, create scenic designs for existing plays, and build characters through observation, improvisation and script analysis. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore careers in theatre arts and begin to develop a portfolio of their work. They also attend and critique theatre productions and identify ways to support the theatre in their community.

CS#: 245

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Technical Theatre I is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Technical Theatre actively engage in the process of designing, building, managing, and implementing the technical aspects of a production. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students explore career opportunities in the theatre, attend and critique theatrical productions, and recognize the responsibilities and the importance of individual theatre patrons in their community.

CS#: 247

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Theatre Arts or Technical Theatre

Course Description:

Note: This is only offered in the Fall semester.
Theatre Production is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for Theatre. Students enrolled in Theatre Production take on responsibilities associated with rehearsing and presenting a fully mounted theatre production. They read and analyze plays to prepare for production; conceive and realize a design for a production, including set, lighting, sound and costumes; rehearse and perform roles in a production; and direct or serve as assistant director for a production. These activities should incorporate elements of theatre history, culture, analysis, response, creative process, and integrated studies. Additionally, students investigate a theatre arts career then develop a plan for potential employment or further education through audition, interview, or presentation of a portfolio. Students also attend and critique theatrical productions and volunteer to support theatre in their community.

CS#: 249

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Photography provides an introduction to the tools, procedures, concepts and application of photography. Students will use digital cameras to stimulate the students’ creative capacities for personal expression and communication. The course includes working procedures and critical skills in looking at photographs and introduces equipment, techniques, skills, and concepts of photography. Students will reflect upon and refine their work; explore cultural and historical connections; analyze, interpret and make informed judgments about photography and the nature of photographic imagery; relate it to other disciplines and discover opportunities for integration; and incorporate literacy and presentational skills. Students are encouraged to provide their own camera with adjustable focus, shutter speeds and aperture. This course requires shooting and computer work often outside of the class period.

CS#: 250

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Course Description:

Architectural Drafting and Design I introduces the student to the basic principles of mechanical drawing. The scope of work students perform ranges from basic lettering and sketching to the drawing of complex assembly of machines. The mastery of this course may provide a solid background for students entering trades that require the reading and interpretation of blue prints.

CS#: 251

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Elective

Prerequisites: C average in Architectural Drafting and Design I

Course Description:

Architectural Drafting and Design II provides students with knowledge in these areas: machine design through a study of special views, fasteners, assembly drawings, cams, gears and welding. House construction and design gives some depth in the architectural field and will also broaden the scope of the student’s drawing skills. Technical illustration and surface developments, as used in sheet metal work, are also studied.

CS#: 262

Grades: 10 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

This course will explore and appreciate music from the specific time period of rock and roll. Students will analyze and describe music, evaluate music and musical performances, and understand the relationships between music and the other arts as well as disciplines outside of the arts.

CS#: 264F/264S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Cost: $85

Music Theory, Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. This class is designed for students who have some background in reading and performing music. Students will apply the concepts of music theory, which is the study of the grammar, vocabulary, and traditional structures of written music. Students will increase music literacy, understand and apply traditional harmonic and melodic structures and practices, listen to and analyze a wide variety of music, and demonstrate mastery of basic compositional skills. Students will be required to take the AP exam in May.

CS#: 266

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Applied Music: Guitar is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral or Instrumental Music. Applied Music offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop and refine performance skills. A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in performing, creating, and responding to music. The focus of this course will be developing instrumental skills in guitar. Students are required to provide their own guitar.

CS#: 267

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Applied Music: Advanced Guitar is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Choral or Instrumental Music. Applied Music offers high school students the opportunity to receive small group or private instruction designed to develop and refine performance skills. A variety of music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine students’ abilities in performing, creating, and responding to music. The focus of this course is to continue developing instrumental skills in guitar. Students must have prior experience in guitar and provide their own guitar.

CS#: 269

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Electronic Music is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Music Technology. Students taking this course are provided with a wide variety of activities and experiences to develop skills in using electronic media and current technology to perform, create, and respond to music. This course will introduce students to the principles and techniques of writing and producing music. Students will learn elements of music theory related to song writing, principles of expectation and fulfillment, music notation for both traditional and commercial music, utilize technology associated with song writing, and learn principles of acoustics and music recording. Students will also be introduced to elements of copyright law and intellectual property. As a final product, students will produce a composition, which will be recorded.

CS#: 270F/270S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Students enrolled in Concert Band are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Instruction is designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Students will acquire the musical skills necessary to participate in instrumental performances. Students develop tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music and performances, and studying historical musical literature. School performances, ensemble, concerts, contest and solo activities are also part of this class and help students develop as musicians.

CS#: 272F/272S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Students enrolled in Concert Band 3/4 are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music, which develops skills in the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Instruction is designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Students will acquire the musical skills necessary to participate in instrumental performances. Students develop tone production, technical skills, intonation, music reading skills, listening skills, analyzing music and performances, and studying historical musical literature. School performances, ensemble, concerts, contest and solo activities are also part of this class and help students develop as musicians. In order to enroll in the course, students must have previously taken Concert Band for two years.

CS#: 275F/275S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Chorus is composed of students with beginning to previous choral backgrounds. Students will study a wide variety of music, which ranges in level of difficulty. Some music reading skills are required, as the focus is on music reading, interpretation, and vocal technique. The group will participate in a number of performances throughout the year. Required performances include school functions, the Christmas programs, and other concerts throughout the year. Instruction is designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. This course also provides students opportunities to develop musicianship and specific skills through ensemble and solo singing. Activities create the development of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature, which is appropriate in difficulty and range for the student.

CS#: 277F/277S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Chorus 3/4 is composed of students with beginning to previous choral backgrounds. Students will study a wide variety of music, which ranges in level of difficulty. Some music reading skills are required, as the focus is on music reading, interpretation, and vocal technique. The group will participate in a number of performances throughout the year. Required performances include school functions, the Christmas programs, and other concerts throughout the year. Instruction is designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. This course also provides students opportunities to develop musicianship and specific skills through ensemble and solo singing. Activities create the development of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature, which is appropriate in difficulty and range for the student. In order to enroll in Chorus 3/4, students must have previously been enrolled in 2 years of Chorus.

CS#: 278F/278S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Note: Audition required.
A Cappella Choir is a small, audition-only ensemble made up of highly talented individuals who enjoy singing a cappella music. Students in this class will be self-motivated and able to work on their own and with a small group. Pitch retention, music reading, sight singing, musical collaboration, rhythm training and “beat box” techniques will be implemented daily. Students will be given accompanied music to sing with the Concert Choir performances as well as their own music for this class. Performances with the Concert Choir are required as well as other performances both in and out of school.

CS#: 282

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Piano and Electronic Keyboard is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Music Technology and Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are offered keyboard classes in order to develop music proficiency and musicianship. Students perform with proper posture, hand position, fingering, rhythm, and articulation; compose and improvise melodic and harmonic material; create and perform simple accompaniments; listen to, analyze, sight-read, and study a variety of keyboard literature; study the elements of music as exemplified in a variety of styles; and make interpretive decisions. This course is for students with little or no experience in piano.

CS#: 283

Grades: 9 - 12  /  Semester  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Piano and Electronic Keyboard Advanced is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Music Technology and Instrumental Music. Students taking this course are offered keyboard classes in order to develop music proficiency and musicianship. Students perform with proper posture, hand position, fingering, rhythm, and articulation; compose and improvise melodic and harmonic material; create and perform simple accompaniments; listen to, analyze, sight-read, and study a variety of keyboard literature; study the elements of music as exemplified in a variety of styles; and make interpretive decisions. This course is for students with prior experience in piano.

Department of World Languages
The World Language Department fosters the development of communication skills in Latin, Spanish, and American Sign Language.  The World Languages Department nurtures the awareness and appreciation of different cultures.

CS#: 410F/410S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

The curriculum of teaching the classical language Latin includes the following: primary emphasis on fundamental grammatical concepts and constructions, study of Latin etymology, limited study of Roman history including famous statesmen and writers, and limited study of mythology. The culture of the Roman Empire is a large emphasis of the course. The students follow a Roman family through its daily living routine.

CS#: 411F/411S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Latin I and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Latin II continues the study of the basic elements of Latin grammar as well as introducing students to the study of Roman art and archaeology. Grammar study will include a review of all major grammatical points covered in Latin I as well as introducing students to advanced grammatical concepts and constructions. These skills and concepts will culminate in the fourth quarter when the class will read an edited and abridged version of the story of Jason and the Argonauts. Students will also explore Roman history by examining the material remains of the the Roman world.

CS#: 412F/412S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Latin II and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Latin III Honors is a survey of Latin literature of the Golden Age with special emphasis on original Roman writings including writings of Eutropius, Cicero and their orations, philosophical works, and letters. Grammar and syntax are studied as part of the Latin readings. A study of the Roman political system, the Roman electoral process, and the Roman government during the period of the Roman Republic and their influences on modern civilizations are covered in the Latin readings of Sallust, Cicero, and others. Students conduct individual research on particular eras of the Republic. They also study historical individuals, such as Caesar, Cleopatra, Mark Anthony, and Octavian.

CS#: 414F/414S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Latin I and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Latin II Honors continues the study of the basic elements of Latin grammar as well as introducing students to the study of Roman art and archaeology. Grammar study will include an accelerated review of all major grammatical concepts and constructions from Latin I followed by a detailed study of advanced grammatical concepts. Students will read edited and abridged versions of Livy’s Ad Urbe Condita and the story of Jason and the Argonauts. The skills and concepts of this course culminate in the study of the unedited and unabridged text of Julius Caesar’s de Bello Gallico in preparation for Honors Latin III and Latin A.P. Students will also explore Roman history by examining the material remains of the the Roman world.

CS#: 415F/415S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Honors Latin III and teacher recommendation

Course Description:

AP Latin is a course which follows the College Board course guidelines for AP Latin and prepares students to be successful on the AP Latin exam. The AP Latin: exam is designed to test the students’ ability to using Vergil and Caesar as a base. The AP Latin course focuses on the in-depth study of selections from two of the greatest works in Latin literature: Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic War. The course requires students to prepare and translate the readings and place these texts in a meaningful context, which helps develop critical, historical, and literary sensitivities. Throughout the course, students consider themes in the context of ancient literature and bring these works to life through classroom discussions, debates, and presentations. Additional English readings from both of these works help place the Latin readings in a significant context.

CS#: 420F/420S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Spanish I provides an introduction to the Spanish language and to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will develop an elementary degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening in the target language. Mastery of basic grammar skills will be demonstrated through oral and written performance, role -playing, group work, and projects. Students will also study the geography, history and culture of various Spanish-speaking countries.

CS#: 421F/421S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish I and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Spanish II emphasizes listening, speaking, reading, writing and comprehension. It enhances fundamental grammar, vocabulary, and communication skills and builds on what students learn in Spanish I. A variety of techniques will be used to become more creative and more proficient in the language. Students will develop an appreciation of the different Hispanic cultures.

CS#: 422F/422S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish II and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Spanish III is partially conducted in the target language. Students will continue to build on their vocabulary while also demonstrating proficiency in grammar, composition, listening, speaking, and reading. Students will also gain knowledge and appreciation of Hispanic culture, history, and geography. Leyendas de España, which is a collection of tales about the history, geography, culture, customs, and values of Spain, will be used to reinforce reading comprehension during the second semester.

CS#: 423F/423S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish II and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Spanish III: Honors is conducted primarily in the target language. Students will continue to build on their vocabulary while also demonstrating advanced proficiency in grammar, composition, listening, speaking, and reading. There will be an intensive focus on writing, listening, and speaking in the target language. This course is geared toward the student who is on the AP track. Students will also gain knowledge and appreciation of Hispanic culture, history, and geography. Leyendas de España, which is a collection of tales about the history, geography, culture, customs, and values of Spain, will be used to reinforce reading comprehension and vocabulary throughout the year.

CS#: 424F/424S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish III and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Spanish IV Honors is a directed study for advanced students. It is conducted primarily in the target language. Along with renowned artists and authors, students are exposed to the history and civilization of the Spanish-speaking world. Listening, reading, writing and speaking skills will be used in the interpretation and analysis of the literature studied. The second semester adds the study of Miguel Cervantes’ novel Don Quixote and the preparation for advanced placement in college.

CS#: 425F/425S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish III and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Cost: $85

Spanish Language Advanced Placement is a course based on the content established by the College Board. Spanish Language: AP covers the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced Spanish writing and conversation. It encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. Spanish Language: AP, emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication, has as its objective the development of the following competencies:

  1. the ability to comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish;
  2. the acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as of modern literature in Spanish;
  3. the ability to compose expository passages, and
  4. the ability to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency.

Students are expected to take the AP exam in May.

CS#: 426F/426S

Grade: 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: AP Spanish

Course Description:

Spanish V Honors seeks to develop language skills that are useful in themselves and that can be applied to various activities, disciplines, and writing activities is emphasized. Students enrolled in this class participate in activities beyond the classroom that could include concerts, theater performances, and community activities. Students will:

  1. initiate and participate in conversations on current or past events that are of significance in the world culture;
  2. promote among their peers, and others, the benefits of world language study and the study of the cultures in which the language is spoken
  3. analyze the main plot, subplot, characters and their descriptions, roles, and significance in authentic literary texts.

Additionally, students gain a general knowledge of the major literary and artistic movements within the cultures being studied.

CS#: 427F/427S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: Spanish I and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

Spanish II Honors emphasizes listening, speaking, reading and writing of the Spanish language as well as a deep appreciation of the Spanish culture. This course builds upon previously learned fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and communication skills learned in Spanish I. Instruction moves at a faster pace than a regular Spanish II class. Content will be partially instructed in the target language of Spanish.

CS#: 428F/428S

Grades: 9 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

Spanish I Honors provides an introduction to the Spanish language and to the culture of the Spanish-speaking world at an advanced pace. Students in Spanish I Honors generally have previous Spanish experience but are not ready to be placed in Spanish II. Students will develop a degree of proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening in the target language. Mastery of basic grammar skills will be demonstrated through oral and written performance, role -playing, group work, and projects. Students will also study the geography, history and culture of various Spanish-speaking countries.

CS#: 440F/440S

Grades: 10 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Course Description:

American Sign Language I is a language used by the majority of deaf and hard of hearing people in the United States and Canada. By learning ASL, students gain access to the deaf culture and insights into features of spoken language. The curriculum is designed to take students who have no knowledge of ASL to the point where they can function comfortably in a wide variety of situations in the deaf and hard of hearing community. Deaf language, culture, and history are taught throughout the curriculum. Students must train their eyes, body movements, and facial expressions in order to communicate effectively. ASL I exposes the student to the basics of signing, vocabulary, sentence structure and basic conversation.

CS#: 441F/441S

Grades: 11 - 12  /  2 Semesters  /  Directed Elective

Prerequisites: ASL I and a teacher recommendation

Course Description:

American Sign Language II builds upon the topics, vocabulary, and grammar introduced in previous lessons in ASL I. Emphasis is placed on the art of deaf conversation, grammar, and ASL gloss (sentence structure). Additional insights into deaf culture and history will be incorporated throughout the curriculum. Students will build on the art of storytelling introduced in ASL I. In addition to in-class activities, students are highly encouraged to attend 10+ hours of outside events in the deaf and hard of hearing community during the year and commit to the total immersion into the deaf and hard of hearing world while in class.

Congratulations to @BishopChatardHS juniors Ethan Clapacs, Maggie Corns, Madeline Felts and Thomas Joven on being named Class of 2020 Rising Stars by the Indiana Association of School Principals. These students are being honored by the IASP for academic achievement. pic.twitter.com/l7BmqoAIEC

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